Book Review: “Ride Me Dirty” by Vanessa Vale

c6d65c3f1b9943d79be6069bdd673af7 (2)

Howdy!

I bet you didn’t think you would get two reviews in one week, huh?

For today, we stray away from the disability/contemporary type of books for a bit and go straight for the 18+/erotica novels! If this isn’t your cup of tea then you can skip it.

I found this book in December. It was part of my “free” purchase spree I took part in and out of the five that I thought would be interesting, this was the only romance book to survive. If you are a lover of erotica books like me, you might have a favorite theme. Some people like outlaw types, billionaires, rock stars (like moi!) or Doms. This one talks about cowboys.

No horses were harmed creating this blog post. 😉


27774596._SY475_

They’re going to claim her. Together.

She just doesn’t know it yet.

Catherine’s life is in New York. The property she’s inherited is in Bridgewater, Montana. Going back to the town she visited every summer as a child stirs up long forgotten memories and a girlhood crush, on not one teen-turned-hot-cowboy, but two. Cousins Jack and Sam Kane. Fortunately for her, in Bridgewater, one cowboy’s never enough.

In this contemporary version of Vanessa Vale’s USA Today bestselling, Bridgewater Ménage series, Catherine is forced to choose the life she really wants: the big-city lawyer or the small town cowgirl with two men who want to take her for a very dirty ride.

taken from Goodreads.

I live in a city that is surrounded by corn, soy beans, and wheat farmers. I also have family members who enjoy watching Westerns on a weekly basis.  So, I’ve never really enjoyed stories focused on cowboys and/or farmers.

Despite all of that above, I still read and quite enjoyed myself!

I don’t think it was the country lifestyle that turned me on (no pun intended) to be honest with you, I think it was the fact that there were two men involved here. Sam and Jack Kane.

giphy

I was pretty jealous of Catherine by the time I ended it.

                                                             ————————————-

It starts innocently enough with a young woman, a lawyer fighting to climb the ranks at her firm, has to go to Bridgewater, Montana to asset her uncles property. On her flight there, a very fine gentleman sat next to her and fantasies start forming in both of their minds about what they wanted to do to each other. When they arrive, Catherine and Jack part but they don’t go far. Catherine has been there before when she was younger, but she is taken aback after finding out a very common practice among everyone in town.

The majority of the women are married to two men!

At first, you’d think this is an awful thing to do, because let’s face it, men can be very disgusting at times! However, the main reason why people do it is so someone is there for the other person. The real term is polyamory, “a lifestyle to being open to the possibility of people having more than one loving, intimidate relationship at a time, with a full knowledge and consent by all partners involved.” I knew of it before I started reading the book, but never considered it until I finished but it is a glorious idea, but I don’t know if I’m only agreeing with it because of my love of Sam and Jack.

There were things I liked about it–obviously–but there were a couple of misspellings that I caught every once in a while. And considering I am awful about spelling words wrong all the time, sometimes I do not notice them right away! However, I have become Grammar police when I do spot some mistakes throughout a story. If it happened in every chapter, I wouldn’t be here saying all of this great stuff about it. I would have deleted it right away, because I hate seeing them all over the place! Thankfully, they were only in two spots. Overall, the story was great and the sex scenes were AHH-mazing too!

Have you read anything by Vanessa Vale? If you read this book, what were your thoughts about it? Did you enjoy it too?

snowflake

A-Z Disability Challenge | Z : Zoom

r51XpHNNT96E97n4YThaIg

I know I’m late on getting this post up, but I have been feeling really lazy in the past few days.

I have always been called “speed demon” because I have my power wheelchair’s speed on high. It’s crazy how much my mom thought the volume was down low while I was in school! Speaking of that, my middle and high schools were attached and had multiple ramps in the hallways. The first time I ever visited, I was probably going into fourth grade and my face lit up. I couldn’t help but race up and down those halls with Blondie and our cousins. Now as an adult, I feel like I have definitely calmed down, and to just seal the deal, the occasional popping a wheelie doesn’t even do it for me anymore. For my parents, this is a blessing and this could be a good sign for other families out there who are dealing with little speed demons at home too, but I feel like I should say that if I was in my power wheelchair for 8 hours straight and there were ramps all around, I would totally go for it in a heartbeat!

Since creating my Instagram account a few months ago, I have been speaking to other people with Arthrogryposis, and it has been really nice to discuss our stories and everything, I also love when parents will follow me too. I get a chance to watch the younger generations grow up and learn how to deal with it in an entirely different era.

There is one little girl that takes me back to starting school for the first time, making what I thought would be long-lasting friendships, and receiving my first wheelchair. The girl’s mother told me once that thanks to her brothers encouragement, she tracked mud all over their house. I could tell she wasn’t thrilled about the incident. There is a big difference between the mini daredevil and I. When I was in elementary school, we left my power chair there and only took it home during summer vacations because our house wasn’t handicapped accessible. So, I never really got to do things like this when I was younger, but this was also at a time where I could scoot everywhere so I didn’t need it too much.

When we did go places that required something more substantial, we used a toddler stroller. It was lightweight so it wasn’t that big of a hassle to put together and take me on trips. I want to say that we used them from the age of seven to probably 11 years old. After I had my surgeries, my body decided that it not only wanted to grow but everywhere! Honestly, for the last five years of being in the stroller, I never wore the seatbelt. I couldn’t. It never wanted to fit around my belly.  Thankfully, by the time I started going to middle school, I was riding the bus to the school and home, so we could keep my wheelchair with me at all times but more importantly, this also meant we could finally get rid of our trustee stroller of the early 2000’s.

Once you got your first power wheelchair, were you described a “speed demon” growing up? Do you remember the first time you discovered rolling down into ramps and/or mud? 

snowflake

 

A-Z Disability Challenge | U : Unconditional Love + Support

One thing that is equally important to a disabled person’s life is having unconditional love and support from their family and friends. I have always had a large group of people in my corner and as blessed as I am with all of this love, I also know that there are others like me who don’t have anybody there for them.

I have been very lucky to have loving parents that believed in me, even as a baby! They are the ones that stopped the doctors at Riley’s, when I was a few months old, to operate on me to make me look ‘normal’ when there was a small chance it wouldn’t help me. They just let me figure things out on my own. Even if that meant, I used my feet for everything and was a wheelchair bound for the rest of my life. I have never given my parents much credit to this decision because it was a risk not knowing how this little girl would be able to do things for herself. Thankfully, I did learn things on my own or with some help from other family members/physical therapists.

I wasn’t aware of how other young teens or adults with various disabilities lived without this kind of love, until I was a senior in high school.

I wish the emotions I was experiencing had sunk in as I feel like it would have helped me understand loads what everyone in my family was trying to relay to me about their worries of me living on a college campus. Now I get why they were so concerned and agree that I was not ready for that kind of commitment. However, when my mom started working at a nursing home that had residents with various levels of mental disabilities, and the stories of some of them being left at the door with trash bags full of clothes and other stuff, really broke my heart!

I do understand that some people cannot handle some traits that certain people produce but you don’t give up on your family like that. A friend of mine has a daughter who is autistic. I have never met her, but have been around other children with autism in the past. So, I am familiar with their quirks and I give kudos to the parents out there dealing with a child like this, but I’ve heard of autistic kids being left behind or being killed because the families just cannot deal with them anymore. Those are always the worst to see online, but when you feel like you’re at your wits end, what is really your next step?

So, I have a questions to my fellow disabled readers out there, did you have a good support behind you growing up? Or were you basically left to be your own hero? If you said “yes” to that, how do begin to trust others that they’re not going to abandon you at the end?

A-Z Disability Challenge | P : The Perks of Being Disabled

Hello!

When I came up with this topic, I really wanted to get through all of the misconceptions of what it is to be a disabled person, and attempt to explain that this life is not as fun as it can be portrayed on TV or even online for some people.

Are there any perks at all?

This question is sort of tough to answer because I think it differs between the ages and how extreme one’s disabilities are compared to the average person.

As a child, I really relished on the special attention of others. When I was in the second grade, I was what you call the “teacher’s pet” because of the favoritism that was on display by my teacher and I. At the time, I wasn’t going to basically ‘fight back’ because I was eating it up so much that I remember when our teacher was taking everybody on a restroom break, she picked me up and carried me so I could hang out with everyone in the hallway. The look on everybody’s faces told me that they were a bit jealous of this affection, although nobody ever said anything to my face.

Now that we have this part out of the way, I feel like I need to say that having an aide (or personal assistant as I’ve heard some bloggers say in the past) isn’t the funnest thing in the world. I’ve loved the people that have taken care of me throughout my time in school, I still keep in touch with a few of them, but I’ve only really appreciated what they did after I had graduated. Of course, there were some issues in the past, but the one that plays out the most was after Christmas break when I was in the sixth grade, I suddenly had a new one. I only had 2 replacements and they were each a surprise. Once all of my friends realized my previous aide was gone, a lot of them were more upset at the fact that they weren’t going to be with me anymore.

My nana and I talked about this a few years later about why this happened. She’s the one who made the statement that maybe it wasn’t the outcome they were angry about, rather than they saw her as a friend. Out of all of the people that took care of me. I had one woman who was in her late 20’s. So, everything that my nana was making a lot of sense because she allowed them to get away with a lot of stuff because she might’ve wanted to be accepted among the rest of the class too, the majority of the other aides I was around would say something either to them or the teacher. I would always feel extremely guilty because if it wasn’t for my disability, they wouldn’t be in the room and could get away with the things they were doing behind our teacher’s back.

Having an aide looks fun at first, but after a while, some things get old. I’m not saying the people that I was with for eight hours, five days a week were elderly, I’m just saying as I continued to get older, I was looking for more independence but protection at the same time. and when you feel like you’re not getting as much as what you feel like you should be, plays with you a little. The one thing that made it worse was when you feel powerless in your situation because I viewed myself as a ‘normal’ person, never someone with a disability, despite driving a wheelchair around in the halls at top speed! I craved to have some space between the two that I feel like I could never achieve unfortunately.

Now that I’ve been out of school for close to 10 years, I have grown to love my body as a disabled woman. I think being away from my friends and of course crushes was a great thing for me because I wasn’t putting myself through all of that pressure to being someone I’m not. Personally, I don’t have any perks of being disabled; I struggle to do things, yes, but I don’t see the things I do as a perk nor having to ask for help for small things, I would rather learn how to do them by myself. So, my way of thinking has changed drastically over the years but I think this process has been a successful one!

If you have a disability of any kind, how do you feel about the perks? do you agree or disagree with what I had to say above? When did you realize your views on the matter changed?

A-Z Disability Challenge | K : Why Kids Should Be Educated About The Various Types Of Disabilities

When I was busy coming up with the letters and their themes, I was a little worried whether it would be a good idea to basically talk about children and how they view people with disabilities twice. After discussing it with my mom, she pretty much convinced me that it would be interesting to speak up on different ages, because as I’ve found out over the years, children under the ages of 5 are curious of their surroundings but they want to learn about everything! Kids in that are higher in age and in school may hang out with friends that can influence them to bully other kids. So, this is what we will be talking about on today’s post!

I remember when I was in grade school, we were all in separate classes for all of our subjects. The only time you basically got to see the other students was at lunch and recess. I knew at the time that there was one other kid with a disability, we never saw each other but only on the occasional field trips and grandparent’s programs. That was it! So, I was hardly ever around somebody that was remotely like me, until I had my surgeries in 2002.

The reason why I bring this up is because throughout my entire time in elementary school, I was basically taught to be like everyone else. I never really experienced any bullying although there was one girl who didn’t like me, but we were at least civil with each other. Anyways, I grew up actually hating to be around other kids with disabilities, because they acted differently than me and my friends–now of course, I feel horrible thinking that way but that was my mindset back then; I wasn’t like them but yet I was!

You can never really tell what a kid thinks about things unless they tell you, but when they don’t ask you questions, they will almost go through life not knowing the real answers. They will begin to seek them through their friends, and you hope that everything those kids have been taught are saying good things but unfortunately not all children are being told that having a disability of any kind can be a beautiful thing. Instead they are fearful by what they don’t understand and relying on that information to others.

I always wished that there were more motivational speakers that came to schools with a variety of disabilities. Unfortunately, I also worry if this were to happen, if they would appericate it because I know everytime we had people come in and talk with us, it would literally go in one ear and out in the other. However, there is that small chance that a few kids that enjoy learning about everything, so it could be a positive experience as well!

I think it would be useful for these youngsters to see a plethora of differences in their bodies, we are not going to look like athletes or supermodels, and it’s important to remember that at any age!

I had a thought the other night about this subject. For some reason, all of the speakers that came to talk to us were all adults. What if kids saw teenagers or someone in their early 20’s? If I saw more women and talking about her disability, I wonder if that would have made a difference because I didn’t learn how to love myself until two years after I graduated from high school altogether. It really sucks to know that not only .did I have to be away from my classmates and watch X-Men: First Class to feel like I can love being the way that I am!

When you were in school, how did you view the speakers that came to talk about the aftermath of drunk-driving or their disabilities? Do you think there should be more people talking about other topics that could be helpful to children as they continue to get older?

A-Z Disability Challenge | B : Building Trust

Howdy!

I created this challenge to talk about disability topics and today’s post will discus about building trust with other people. So, this piece will contain some personal advice and experiences, but it’s more directed to the families of disabled kids and young adults.


Trust is a big thing.

You learn it from a very young age, I think you don’t necessarily realize it until you begin to look back and it does make sense, it all goes together. Here’s an example, whenever a toddler is about to do something he’s not suppose to, you tell him “no” and try to explain that he’ll get hurt. You can’t expect your child to leave it alone, that’s a rarity even in itself, so you’ll most likely see the kid do it anyways and start wailing because it got a bump on the head. First off, kids have to learn things on their own. You hope they’ll get the message and learn to trust you the next time you say something like that, but even you know better not to trust a young child either. So, it goes back and forth quite a bit…

As somebody with a disability, I rely on people to help me with things. I don’t like to, because I always feel like I can figure it out on my own, but there are things that I cannot do by myself so I need help with them. When you have to invite a third party, it can always be a hit or miss. I learned this while I was in school. Whenever my aides were out for a period of time, I had many, many substitutes that would have to be with me throughout the day. I would have to teach them what I needed for each class and what they could do to pass the time. They were kind of dragged from one place to another; not to mention to give your trust on a person you’ve just met once or only had a few times, circumstances would worry me sometimes because I didn’t know what this person would do.

Honestly, I tend to give people the benefit of a doubt. It’s one of the bad things about going with the flow. You don’t want to second guess people right away, so you go all in and give your trust away like it’s pieces of candy. However, I’ve learned over the years to listen to my body about certain things: your gut will tell you when something’s up and mine would flare up a lot while I was in school. I would break down in the middle of classes and feel completely awful, afterwards I would be switched out of that class and I’d calm down and be myself again. Unfortunately, I haven’t had this happen whenever I’m around people, just whenever I’m in a different place physically. I guess that’s better than anything though, right?

For families of disabled kids though, everything is heightened. They’re not there with their child. They have to hope that whoever’s watching over their kid is doing what that person would do for their own children. If something has happened that is a little weird, things can escalate really fast and as someone who has had been in this kind of situation, it feels horrible. You don’t want to get anyone in trouble, but if something is off about how you’re being treated whether it’s physically or emotionally, it is best to speak up about it. You don’t deserve to live in fear of what’s going to happen once the dominoes collapse. They have to give up a lot of their trust to the people their child is around on any given day, and that includes their friends, and that alone can cause a lot of anxiety, but you do continue to take chances because you do want your children to be treated like everybody else, if they don’t, how is your child suppose to live in the real world?

How are you with trusting others around you? And families, what kept you going when things weren’t ideal with your child’s aide or surroundings? Do you have any advice you could to other parents out there?

REVIEW: “Fuller House”

review2

Howdy!

I did not plan on doing two TV shows reviews back-to-back, I kind of figured I would slow down once I finished Sabrina, but by the time I got to the end of that one, I was already halfway through season three of Fuller House.

At the end of 2017, I actually decided to give this show a chance, like most people, I was on the fence about reboots of old shows from your childhood. Full House was a big thing for my sister and I back in the day, I remember coming home from school and instead of immediately working on homework, our mom would make us a plate of chips for a snack and let us watch both Full House and Family Matters on the family TV. Since I was older, I think I remember more of the plot and characters, so even though I hesitanted about this new series, I was really about it too.

Backstory

For this show, we have Candace Cameron Bure’s character “D.J.” moving back into her childhood home after the death of her husband, Tommy Fuller. D.J. has three sons: Jackson, Max and Tommy Jr. When the show actually starts, Jackson is 13, Max is 8, and Tommy is still a baby. After her father, Danny, gets a new job in Los Angeles, her middle sister Stephanie and best friend Kimmy Gibbler and her daughter Ramona move into the house to help her raise the family, like Jesse and Joey did when she was a young girl.

Just because this is a totally new show, it doesn’t mean we lose our beloved characters of the original. Bob Saget, Dave Coulier, John Stamos, Lori Laughlin, & even Blake and Dylan Tumoy-Wihoit are recurring stars to come and go throughout the series. We are allowed to see what all happened after the first show ended, and I’m really happy that they added them back on, but I also like the fact that it’s not always about them. The show covers some of the same topics like in the original. There’s still a lot of talks and hugs in the family, they get a dog: named Cosmo, there’s lots of music, and new and old flames in the mix. It’s really about the next generations living in that iconic San Francisco house.

Characters

I have always loved Stephanie, so the fact that the middle child: Max would be the one to hook me is great. He is definitely my favorite. He is portrayed to act like his grandpa Danny, in the fact that he likes to wear vests and be a total gentleman, with a strong urge to clean everything in sight! However, he does act like his mom as he likes to be perfect and has a great catchphrase: HOLY CHALUPAS! Don’t be surprise if I start using that on a daily basis!

Jackson and Max are clearly opposites in every direction, but I like the fact that they seem to get more along compared to D.J. and Stephanie did when they were younger, but we girls just seem to be a little too dramatic at times. And then, you have little Tommy. One bad thing about the seasons being shorter is that we don’t get the lengthy differences with each age. When the character Michelle was on there, we got to see a baby that wasn’t even a year old yet grow into a young kid going to elementary school. I feel since there’s such a large gab in between, we don’t get to see a lot of the developments of this character. Even though he’s such a minor character, he does steal the show whenever he’s around the family dog Cosmo and hanging out with his brothers.

Now Ramona is different in comparisons to all of the female characters of Full House. She’s the modern, technology driven daughter of Kimmy Gibbler and her ex-husband, Fernado (and no, I will not spell out his entire name on here!) and she is the relativity same age as Jackson, but I see her more like an older sister, keeping an eye out for all of the boys. Considering both of her parents are really nutty, she’s like the polar opposite of them and that’s actually really refreshing to me. She still has to deal with the same old school worries like making friends and smart choices for herself, but to know she has a great family to fall back on keeps her grateful.

Overall

My point of view has changed drastically since I first tried to watch it in 2017, so I am happy I gave it another chance. This show was really good to binge watch at night, but you have to be careful because you will laugh your butt off at the crazy antics of these characters. And it’s not all Kimmy either!

I’ll admit though, there were some themes that I felt were pushed a little bit too much. I didn’t like the fact that D.J. quickly went back into the dating scene, even their dad took two seasons to get back in the groove again. So when the story line was going back and forth between Matt and Steve, I thought that made D.J. look like a slut for having two relationships going at once. And sorry not sorry, I was always Team Matt. I thought her relationship with Steve was good like it was, just as friends. However, once I started season four, I did begin to see the light and thought, “okay, maybe I was too quick to judge.” I’d still like her to go back to Matt if it wasn’t too awkward because I definitely don’t like him with you-know-who.

So, have you watched Full House yet? What’s keeping you away, what are some of your fears of the show? If you have watched it, what are your favorite characters, episodes and even season?