February Playlist

Happy Monday everyone!

The best way to describe February’s playlist is chaotic. I thought it would be similar to last month, but I was wrong. It has its own style. I discovered so much music this month that I’ve been both happy and stunned at the same time because the number of genres in it is so beautiful and I cannot wait to share it with you today.

At the beginning of the month, I was being pulled into my hard rock artists and I think I’ve had my foot holding the door to that genre the whole time. As I was traveling through pop and even epic country/rock music (which is SO ahh-mazing!) worlds I would literally make a circle back to enjoy some of my beloved tracks. I would love to share one artist or band every month, but I find it really challenging because I shuffle around so much.

And yes, I have been using the same banner I use on Instagram and Twitter as the playlist’s cover. I don’t know why I’m just doing it now, but it’s been fun coming up with different lettering to symbolize each month. Unfortunately, I can’t use the ones I made above, mainly because it is too large to fit, but since I also make the others, so thankfully I have the others!

I don’t have a general idea why I made January so gloomy, but it was just wanted for that banner. I knew for February, I wanted to go all out for Valentine’s Day, and I used the one color I hate with a passion: pink. I had to put some black in there because the hot pink was a little too strong to match with any other color on the app’s selections. I will (hopefully) continue to do this for the rest of the year and maybe it’ll attract some more people that cruise around on Spotify for more styled playlists.

Here is my Top 25 for the time being. Keep an eye and hear out on my blog’s Facebook and Instagram to see if I include any more songs. If you want to take the easy route, you can look into the entire playlist on Spotify as I’m always updating there as well!

Decode by Paramore
My Universe by Kurt Hugo Schneider featuring Alex Goot & First To Eleven
Feeling Good by Nina Simone
Man On A Mission by Oh The Larceny
Liar by Britney Spears
Your Call by Gaby Grace
Where Is Your Hero Now by Sami J. Laine x Epic Music World
Stabbing In The Dark by Ice Nine Kills

Sweere by Papa Roach featuring FEVER 333 & Sueco
Dirty Talk by Wynter Gordon
Stranger by Hilary Duff
Gold Trans Am by Kesha
Daddy AF by Slayyter
Pink Pony Club by Chappell Roan
Weak by JoJo
Surface Pressure by Jessica Darrow
Back From The Dead by Halestorm
Cutting It Close by Rain City Drive
ABCDEFU by Gayle
Hallelujah by Underoath

Rest In Peace by Dorothy
Boyfriend by Dove Cameron
Tomorrow by Avril Lavigne
Can’t Take My Eyes Off You by Cary Brothers
Yours by Ella Henderson

Before I let you go, I wanted to talk about the Super Bowl halftime show.

I’m not a fan of football by any means, but I enjoy watching the commercials and the halftimes shows. I always think they can be a hit or miss, and I always have some worries about what the artist would do. I did not know who was going to host until probably late November. I feel like we knew pretty early on who was going to play for the last few years, but once I heard about Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg and Eminem was going to be on stage, I was so pumped!

As you may know, I tend to listen to a lot of old school hip hop, and even though I wasn’t expecting to see 50 Cent there, I brought me back to my middle school days because I was a huge G Unit fan and if you didn’t know, I basically wanted to become the female, disabled version of Dr. Dre after graduating high school. So, the lineup (not so much into Kendrick Lamar, though I do respect him as an amazing record producer!) was everything to my mom and me. It was incredible to see these great artists of the 80’s through the mid 2000’s performing some of their fan’s favorites!

What were you listening to in the month of February? What did you think about the Halftime show? Who would you like to host next year?

snowflake

Music Monday | Rick Rubin

Howdy!

Last week in the series, I talked about Dr. Dre, who I have pretty known my whole life (music wise) because of my mother and the amount of old school rap that was played on our cassette player located in my parent’s room! However, for this week I will be discussing my admiration for Rick Rubin.

Rick Rubin is a very special person for me, because by the time I started listening to Linkin Park in 2009, he had just finished working with him on their album “Minutes To Midnight” (2008). This was my first memory of him working with anybody that I enjoyed at the time. So, while I was getting myself deeper and deeper into the world of Linkin Park, I was learning what could (at my own pace) of this interesting music producer. I call him “interesting” because although most producers want to work with a large variety of acts, they usually tend to stick to one genre and stay there for the rest of their lives. Rick Rubin has had most of his success in heavy metal, hard rock and rap music.

The two most popular acts I learned in the first two years was Jay-Z and the Beastie Boys. He has worked with many, many other bands over the years, but these were the two that sort of explain the reason why he helped Linkin Park in the past.

The album I associate Rick helping produce the most is “The Black Album” that was released in 2003. This was supposed to be the final album for the rapper before he retired from the music scene, but considering a year later he and Linkin Park came together like Run-DMC and Aerosmith did in the late 1980’s with “Walk This Way”. Although I don’t think they released an album like Jay-Z and LP did; technically they did an album and put on a concert and would later crash each other’s tours to perform “Numb/Encore” every once in a while. When Chester Bennington died in 2017, Jay-Z was out on tour with his wife BeyoncĂ©, and he performed the hit but instead of doing Chester’s parts, the audience sang every word. It was very beautiful and a great gesture to Chester, his family and the rest of the band too!

Rick Rubin was the reason for this match to come together in the early 2000’s, because he had just finished working with Jay-Z and was close to LP too, as Rick is known to experiment in the nu metal scene in that time frame. The reason why it was so huge for these two acts to do this was because not many people went outside their comfort zones in the music world, you stayed in your genre for most of your career. At least, that’s my take on the scene and I was very much part of it since I really didn’t like to go outside of my bubble gum pop world although there were was a time were I enjoyed rap music, but you can tell I didn’t listen to a lot of rap between the year 1999 to 2002, because I was busy enjoying Britney Spears and Backstreet Boys too much to really pay attention!

Nowadays, it’s really accepted to like a wide variety of music and not to mention foreign languages that come with these new changes too! Radio is still a big way to introduce new music to a larger audience to the world, but it’s also important to realize that record producers to go through this switch too! They will always stay within their comfort zone, which I think for Mr. Rubin, it is heavy metal, but from time to time he will find something different to sink his teeth into and it might shock a few people that follow his journey just as much as the other musicians too.

So, if you are a lover of Rick Rubin’s work, who is your favorite act(s)? And do you have a favorite era of time too?

snowflake

 

 

Music Monday | Dr. Dre

Howdy!

Last month I announced that I was going to do another series on my blog. It would replace my normal summer Tune Tuesday posts since I am no longer publishing anything on those days, instead I would switch it to Monday.

The theme would be based off of what inspired to want to become a record producer after I graduated from high school ten years ago, but I would also include people who I look to nowadays. Every month, I will post a banner that will have two people I will focus my attention on, and hopefully that’ll keep you excited for the next one.


I have always had a love/hate relationship with hip hop music. There are words that I don’t really enjoy hearing all the time, such as “bitch,” and the “n” word that you will never find me using ever! I also don’t like the way women and the breed pit bulls are being laid out whether in a rhyme or the music video. They allow each part to be stereotyped, even themselves as musicians. Whenever people listen to rap music, the audience automatically assumes the person spitting a line, is a gangbanger, has abused women, over uses alochol and drugs, etc. Something about the world of music affected me in both a positive and negative way that I still wanted to be the disabled and female version of Dr. Dre.

Since I was born in the early 90’s, and my mom was both a lover of rap and rock music, there was a lot of sounds jamming in our household. My dad worked construction, so he was gone through most of the day and would get home late, so while we spent time with mom, she would play various cassettes and CDs of music. When we were home sick, I really relished in the environment. Since my sister and I were introduced to the genre at a fairly young age, we weren’t shown the violent side of the genre, I actually didn’t know anything about it until I was in my teens and then everything I heard as a child made more sense to me.

Although I don’t remember if my mom had any of Dr. Dre’s albums when we were kids, I still knew why he was so important to the music world. To be perfectly honest, I’ve always felt I don’t have to listen to older music if I highly respect and understand what each person did for their genre. Dr. Dre was no different. I knew he was at the heart of the rap world, but I didn’t really see it first hand until I hit my second phase of listening to that kind of music in 2003.

I don’t remember how I was introduced to 50 Cent’s music. I feel like Eminem had something to do with it, and at this time, Dr. Dre was producing music for Eminem and they were both working with 50 Cent to release him to the masses, so they were a formable force to be reckoned with, almost like a Holy Trinity, together they could release anything and everybody would love it.

The music video for 50 Cent’s hit “In Da Club” is showing you how they molded him into this person; they influeced him into this giant act to entertain people from around the world. It was incrediable! In a way, that is what a music producer is suppose to do, is make you into this beast, give you the confidence in yourself to be able to make greant music. I feel there’s a lot of trust going into this, because they direct you into the right lane, they become your mentor and inspire you to release your demons, passions, easily, and because of this everything you say can be taken in a certain way, whether that is a good or bad thing is debatable. They believe in you and see your true purpose and I think that’s what makes Dr. Dre a legend.

I use to have dreams and write songs throughout my time in school about the possibility of working with my favorite rappers of the time. Since I was highly obsessed with 50’s group G Unit as a teen, they appeared quite a bit but once I decided on what I’d like to study in college and after I was accepted into the school, sadly those dreams became less and less, and I wonder if I should have read into that change a little more. My ability to write songs officially vanished in 2008, which I find interesting because I always think that this was the last year rap music felt new and exciting. Of course, this is only my opinion and considering I made the choice to give the genre another try after a six year hiatus, I can’t say for sure it was a great idea on my part.

Which side of Dr. Dre do you like the best, his rap career (whether with N.W.A. or solo) or are you more interested who he works with and the beats he creates?

snowflake