Book Review: I Am Malala by Malala Yousafzai & Patricia McCormick

Howdy!

I think three days after I finished writing my reveiw on “Throne Of Glass” by Sarah J. Maas, I went exploring on Amazon’s free ebooks. After about a hour later of scrolling through the many pages, I found two books: I Am Malala by Malala Yousafzai with Patricia McCormick and Explicit by Roxy Sloane. A little mix of biographical and erotica; two of my favorite subjects! Although I was more excited about this book compared to the other, but once I finished Malala’s book, I was able to shifted my direction to Roxy’s and I finally found balance again.

The book isn’t as different as I originally thought it would be. If you’re familiar with her first book, which came out almost immediately after she and her family came to the United Kingdom in 2012. At the time of this release, she had only written two books. This is the young reader’s edition and it has another author aiding her to continue spreading her story around the world. I have no idea if she has written any more books recently, so I apologize for that bit of information.


52670864._SY475_I Am Malala is the memoir of a remarkable teenage girl who risked her life for the right to go to school. Raised in a changing Pakistan by an enlightened father from a poor background and a beautiful, illiterate mother from a political family, Malala was taught to stand up for what she believes.

I Am Malala tells her story of bravery and determination in the face of extremism, detailing the daily challenges of growing up in a world transformed by terror. Written for her peers with critically acclaimed author Patricia McCormick, this important book is about the value of speaking out against intolerance and hate. Its a message of hope from one girl who dreams of education for every girl in every country.

taken from Goodreads


Since I finished reading “Women Of Scotland” in mid-March, I have been craving nothing but more stories of women all over the world, and I’m not only reading about them, I have been watching various documentaries about women’s lives. I want to try to imagine their hardships but their favorite things as well.

When I saw it on the feed, I was so excited, I literally shouted “YES!” after I clicked check out or whatever. I started on it rather quickly, but I only knew about 1% of Malala’s life. She was the Pakistani girl who was fighting for little girls and women like her to go to school. That’s it. I remember hearing about her on the news but that’s all I was able to hear and/or see about her and honestly, I feel pretty embarrassed that is all I knew up until I started reading this book.

I never imagined her life revolving around her family, her father especially, who is mentioned almost as much as Malala. She really holds him responsible for the drive to campaign against their own country, Pakistan, to allow their mothers, sisters, aunts, and wives go to school and educate themselves more on various subjects. They became targets of the Taliban, as they were the ones saying that women should be taking care of their families and living their lives more in an Islamic way. Wives and mothers should wear burkas, which are black clothes around their bodies from head to toe, to cover everything from the public. And little girls shouldn’t go to school, because once they hit the age of 12, they will be married to someone who could be ten times older than them and she would lose every part of her and have to care for the offspring of the match.

I have known about child marriages for a long, long time. As someone who is obsessed with learning about the 14th onward to 17th century, child marriages were common place in every sort of life. It didn’t matter if you were poor or rich, if you wanted to make ties bind or stronger, or else want money, daughters in ages of two towards eighteen were basically sold over to that person or family.

What gets me is that it is still taking place, I mean there are “arranged marriages” but nobody until the age of 13 needs to leave their family, school, etc to become someone’s wife and produce children at this point in their lives. My position on this subject isn’t just directed towards the women, you have to think if this is happening to young girls, there’s a chance that there young “men” who could be pulled into this lifestyle as well. Everyone is involved when it comes to money and possessions.

Anyways, back to the book. I find Malala to be a very lucky girl. She has survived at being shot at on a crowded bus, because she was speaking up for not only herself but her friends and the many generations of girls in the future who desperately want to attend school and learn more about the world around them and how they matter in a world at the moment. I think she is lucky that her family is as strong and courageous as she is, they want to fight with her and learn more about themselves too.

I highly recommend you buy this edition or her first book and really get yourself comfortable because it is a bumpy ride but I am so glad I found it and enjoyed expanding my knowledge about her culture a little bit more. I also love Malala for being so brave in her life so far. I hope she continues doing her thing for years to come.

Have you read “I Am Malala” or any other editions yet? What was the biggest thing you learned in her story?

snowflake

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