A-Z Disability Challenge | J : Just Watch Me

Hello.

I don’t think people will ever understand the importance of this phrase. It is like Nike’s motto, but it’s more straight forward. Whenever you say it that means you already know you’re going to do it, there’s no use of trying to talk you out of it. While the other is telling you to do something, you’re still liable to think about it and see whether or not if you need to do it.

For people with various types of disabilities, this is like embed into their brains. It’s definitely been into my head for what feels like forever. There is nothing like proving people wrong, and I always strive for that opportunity to look at someone and not necessarily say it to their faces, “do not underestimate me.” It’s the most amazing rush, as it’s second to being an adrenaline junkie, which a lot of us will put the two together and that is usually a recipe for both excitement and disaster, but we normally don’t go looking for that other part!

I think a lot of people can learn from people with disabilities, especially if they have a physical disability. We tend to push ourselves harder, because it’s not all about proving others wrong, we’re also trying to prove us wrong too. Our bodies get weaker the older we become because that’s part of life, but sometimes once we realize we’re missing out on something or losing an ability that helps us to do things can help build up our strength within and we try to change it for the better!

Here is something to keep in mind:

There is one thing that I need to speak up about first, we do have our limitations like everybody else. Sometimes those limits need to be tested of course, but it’s all about patience. Nothing you do will come to you overnight. If you’re like me, you’ll be up all night trying to come up other ways to complete something! I do not like to throw in the towel as some people would say but if none of my plans work, there is no shame in letting go. This is a harsh thing to think about, because we as humans hardly ever want to accept defeat, and when it comes to disabled people, it certainly feels like the universe is letting us down. If something is not working out for you, you can either think of it in another perspective or you have to leave it in peace.

When I lost the ability to get myself onto my bed or couch by myself, it was the worst feeling in the world because to me, that was my main thing I could do if I wanted to get out of my floor or room in general. It does continue to hurt (mentally) every once in a while, and in the last few years my parents have been losing their strength in being able to lift me off the floor, and that means I am not able to do anything on the floor like I used to. I don’t like to accept something I can no longer accomplish on my own, but I am able to look at it in a different way, because now that we’ve moved into our new house, I am getting out of my room a lot more because there is so much space between rooms. Being able to move around in my wheelchairs is as good as scooting, plus there’s a lot less pain in my back and hips too!

How are you with proving people wrong with your limited abilities? What is your mindset whenever you cannot do something that you’ve worked so hard to finish?